How Do You Judge Success…?

So you’ve toiled long and hard to pull together your first manuscript – or second – or whatever.  You’ve fought the good fight and, by some miracle, formatted it so it looks at least half-decent on an eReader.  You’ve swallowed back your fears, assembled your ego around you, grimaced, and pressed the publish button…

Then what?

How do you judge success?

It seems to me that this is just as variable a concept as the diverse subject matter of stories themselves…

For me, my views have varied over the last couple of years and I guess I’m now coming to terms with the following phrase: whatever defines success for one of my stories, it will likely take a long time to reveal itself.

I suppose a lucky – very lucky – few will see success immediately.  For some reason their books will spark a wildfire of enthusiasm amongst readers and their stories will fly off the shelves; personally I think this is an extremely remote possibility if you don’t have the weight and power of a publishing house’s promotional machinery behind you.

The rest of us will need to be much more patient.

I started writing with a simple ambition: to test myself at a personal level.  Pretty much just to see if I could do it…  It’s not an easy task, as I’m sure most of you will agree…  In the end, I produced a book and faced a new question: what next?  This was what led me to publish… no dreams of grandeur, or huge reward, or whatever…  Basically, if I’d done nothing, Firebird would have sat rotting on a disk-drive somewhere.  It would have had absolutely zero possibility of being enjoyed by anyone else.

Now Firebird has been out there for almost two years.  It has been downloaded several thousand times but, generally, I feel pleased if it moves even a tiny handful of copies in a month.  Is this the benchmark?  Well – given the amount of books on offer, the amount of books I personally get through in an average year and the very limited exposure my books get – maybe the answer is yes?  For sure, I feel very honoured and humbled that my story is still occasionally being picked up and read by people.

What publishing also did though, was give me new insights.  The simple, brutal, reality of having your writing in general circulation, the often critical nature of feedback, and the occasional positive encouragement have enabled me to step forwards and hone my writing skills.  I am, despite the occasional pains, eternally grateful for this.

It has also helped me to move on and produce a second book.

These things would have been denied me, if I’d not taken the plunge.

Like so much in life, the different facets of success are often hidden in the corners of the obvious, tucked away behind so-called measures of popularity, masked by charts, star-ratings, and sales figures…  In my opinion, being successful is not, on its own, a viable motivation for writing.  Better, surely, to write simply to find out if you can, to stretch your imagination, to see if you can find personal pleasure and enjoyment from the process and, in the end, to discover whether your tales can entertain others?

Perhaps the bottom line becomes:  does it matter; tell your stories anyway?

Because an untold story has no chance at all.

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About anthonybellaleigh

Writing to amuse myself and entertain others. (https://anthonybellaleigh.wordpress.com)

Posted on January 20, 2013, in General, Random, Writing and tagged , , , , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink. 6 Comments.

  1. Good thoughts and insights, especially being in it for the long haul. Richard Bach, (“Jonathon Livingston Seagull”) when asked what a professional author was, stated: “A professional writer is an amateur who didn’t quit.”
    LOVE that quote!

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  2. Good post Ant, but I suppose writers are like adrenalin junkies, seeking the next snippit of praise. The last five star review is never good enough, we have a tendancy to dissect every sentence, every word, and the one star review drives us to distraction, asking ourselves why haven’t they told me why exactly they don’t like my book, rather than being vague. But as we write more books and publish more, we seem to set the benchmark higher. Perhaps, I’m just being my normal paranoid self and seeing ghoulies where they don’t exist, but then, that’s just me.

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    • Hey! :) Great to hear from you Alb.

      I guess I’m just a bit cynical about reviews. I’m not convinced that something as subjective as a story is best served by them (especially given that they mainly seem to be written by people who feel confident about putting their writing up in public: i.e other authors). Having said that, I do find positive reviews incredibly encouraging!

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  3. Writing is one step. Marketing is another, and I’m not one bit confident about that.

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